Exhibitions | Dave Robertson | Accentuated Fluidity2019-08-26T12:11:41+00:00

Exhibitions

ACCENTUATED FLUIDITY

DAVE ROBERTSON

Berman Contemporary, 2019

In Robertson’s other photographic or digitally rendered prints we find this prevailing occupation to be central. His Urban Textures are focused on ‘the ever-changing transitory nature of cityscapes’. What fascinates the artist here are ‘the marks and textures visible on urban structures’. Once again, however, it is the sublimity of the artist’s insight which compels, his ability to zone in on a finely detailed configuration – ‘the scratches on a road-side wall left by accident-prone motorists’, the scuffed and abraded nature of an ever-changing ever-vulnerable world. Similarly, his Lamina Series and his Eastside prints, while seen in their splendid isolation, asks us to consider the greater intricacies which make up existence. Of his Eastside series, Roberson notes that what ‘excited’ him was ‘the paintings accentuated fluidity when moving on the smooth plastic surface’ which served as its substrate.

The phrase – accentuated fluidity – is telling. For therein we find ourselves returning to the words of the great philosopher of movement, Henri Bergson. ‘Let us unfasten the cocoon, awaken the chrysalis’, Bergson writes. ‘Let us restore to movement its mobility, to change its fluidity, to time its duration’. For it is only when one allows for this release is one able to recognise the inescapability of a primal flux, life’s ‘unceasing creation’ and its ‘uninterrupted up-surge of novelty’. It is this release, this attentiveness to an ‘accentuated fluidity’ which is both the artist’s focus and the source of his infinite wonder.

Exhibitions

ACCENTUATED FLUIDITY

DAVE ROBERTSON

Berman Contemporary, 2019

In Robertson’s other photographic or digitally rendered prints we find this prevailing occupation to be central. His Urban Textures are focused on ‘the ever-changing transitory nature of cityscapes’. What fascinates the artist here are ‘the marks and textures visible on urban structures’. Once again, however, it is the sublimity of the artist’s insight which compels, his ability to zone in on a finely detailed configuration – ‘the scratches on a road-side wall left by accident-prone motorists’, the scuffed and abraded nature of an ever-changing ever-vulnerable world. Similarly, his Lamina Series and his Eastside prints, while seen in their splendid isolation, asks us to consider the greater intricacies which make up existence. Of his Eastside series, Roberson notes that what ‘excited’ him was ‘the paintings accentuated fluidity when moving on the smooth plastic surface’ which served as its substrate.

The phrase – accentuated fluidity – is telling. For therein we find ourselves returning to the words of the great philosopher of movement, Henri Bergson. ‘Let us unfasten the cocoon, awaken the chrysalis’, Bergson writes. ‘Let us restore to movement its mobility, to change its fluidity, to time its duration’. For it is only when one allows for this release is one able to recognise the inescapability of a primal flux, life’s ‘unceasing creation’ and its ‘uninterrupted up-surge of novelty’. It is this release, this attentiveness to an ‘accentuated fluidity’ which is both the artist’s focus and the source of his infinite wonder.