Natalie Field | Series | Sol-Shadows2019-09-02T17:14:36+00:00

Sol-Shadows

Natalie Field

An integral part of my creative process relies on the digital capture of natural elements, which are deconstructed in post-production, to be reconstructed into new realities. However, I also wanted to celebrate the innate beauty of the botanicals themselves. My first expression of this was to create direct copies using a digital scanner with accompanying annotations as one would see in traditional herbarium collections.

Upon discovering the work of Anna Atkins, I fell in love with the idea of returning to my photographic roots and using the cyanotype technique. I was curious to see how I could implement this traditional process to capture an alternative view of my own samples.

Rather than capture all the details verbatim like the scanner, the cyanotype offers a more eerie representation of the subject matter. The resulting images are reminiscent of the nuclear shadows seen in Hiroshima, in which only the outline of the object remained. This “impression” of reality resonates with the Human.Nature theme of the transient nature of matter. In time the botanical samples themselves will fade and decay, and only the Sol-Shadows, the sun-imprinted memories, will remain as evidence that they ever existed.

Sol-Shadows

Natalie Field

An integral part of my creative process relies on the digital capture of natural elements, which are deconstructed in post-production, to be reconstructed into new realities. However, I also wanted to celebrate the innate beauty of the botanicals themselves. My first expression of this was to create direct copies using a digital scanner with accompanying annotations as one would see in traditional herbarium collections.

Upon discovering the work of Anna Atkins, I fell in love with the idea of returning to my photographic roots and using the cyanotype technique. I was curious to see how I could implement this traditional process to capture an alternative view of my own samples.

Rather than capture all the details verbatim like the scanner, the cyanotype offers a more eerie representation of the subject matter. The resulting images are reminiscent of the nuclear shadows seen in Hiroshima, in which only the outline of the object remained. This “impression” of reality resonates with the Human.Nature theme of the transient nature of matter. In time the botanical samples themselves will fade and decay, and only the Sol-Shadows, the sun-imprinted memories, will remain as evidence that they ever existed.